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Parents Protesting a Kid with a Peanut Allergy: Are They Right?

Peanut plant

Image: Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler's Medizinal-Pflanzen

A group of parents in Volusia County, Florida are picketing their children’s elementary school to force the withdrawal of student with a peanut allergy. Their reason for this noble crusade is that the rules the school put in place are too onerous and taking away from time better spent on academics. Do the parents have a point and what were the burdensome rules anyway?

No, the parents do not have a point. In fact, they are horrible people and one can only hope their children don’t look up to them too much. The rules in question were that students had to leave their lunches outside the classroom and had to wash their hands when they arrive in the morning and after lunch. They’re not even being asked not to bring peanuts to school.

As a parent, I hope my child leaves her lunch where her teachers tell her to leave it and I don’t think her time at school will be any more enriching because she’s able to see her lunch throughout the morning. And I try to teach good hygiene. I know not everyone is good about their hands, but I think there was a time when people would at least try to convince their children that it was a good idea. If you’re so in love with filthiness that you find yourself becoming angry when your child is asked to practice basic hygiene, I think it’s time to take a good, hard look at yourself in the mirror.

Finally, peanut allergies are no joke. Kids can die from them. It should go without saying, but when kids die, it’s a big deal. When you’re doing the mental math weighing slight inconvenience for your own kid versus the life of someone else’s and your answer is “Let’s roll the dice on the allergic kid!,” it’s safe to say that somewhere along the line you’ve really lost your way.

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