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Please Make Peach Frozen Yogurt

I just started making my own ice cream this summer and I have to say, the experience has been everything I’ve hoped for and more. I know there are some really delicious store-bought frozen treats, but I don’t think any can compare to that first bite of creamy homemade ice cream straight from the churner.
On the recommendation of a friend the first thing I bought (after acquiring my KitchenAid Mixer ice cream making attachment) was a copy of David Lebovitz’s book The Perfect Scoop.
What I’ve been dying to make is the peach ice cream, because as Lebovitz says, “more than any other homemade ice cream, this is perhaps the most beloved of all flavors.”
Peaches are practically falling off the trees so the time was ripe (sorry) for me to make my first batch.
But instead of going with the ice cream I decided to try the recipe that followed: peach frozen yogurt.
It did not disappoint: the color is so beautiful (a soft pinkish coral) you can’t believe it’s real. And the taste is just extraordinary. If you got your ice cream maker at the ready I beg you to make it before those peaches stop falling…

Recipe for Peach Frozen Yogurt (adapted from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz)
-Peel 1 1/2 pound of very ripe peaches (about 5 peaches)
-Slice them in half, and remove the pits. Cut the peaches into chunks and cook them with 1/2 cup of water in a medium saucepan over medium heat, covered, stirring occasionally, until soft and cooked through, about 10 minutes.
-Remove peaches from the heat, stir in 3/4 cup of sugar, then chill completely in the refrigerator.
-Pureed the cooked peaches and any liquid in a blender with 1 cup of whole-milk Greek yogurt until smooth (it’s OK if there are some chunks remaining). Mix in a few drops of lemon juice.
-Freeze the mixture in your ice cream maker according to the directions.
ENJOY!

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