Salad 101: Three-Day Cole Slaw

Welcome to another installment of Salad 101! Now the name for this cole slaw is a bit misleading—I’m not giving you a cole slaw recipe that takes 3 days to make. That would be just mean! This slaw is so named because it lasts that long in your fridge, making it perfect for a Friday BBQ, then a Saturday picnic, then leftovers for Sunday sandwiches. It’s also named “Three-Day” because this tangy slaw gets even better the longer the flavors have to mingle, so that third day will equal perfection. I actually got the name from one of my fave new cookbook finds: Screen Doors and Sweet Tea by Martha Hall Foose. What I love about her recipe is that it’s vinegar-y, versus heavy with mayo. Don’t get me wrong, I love my Hellman’s; but sometimes I think the classic picnic salads like egg, potato, and slaw get weighed down by too much mayo, which masks the flavor of the main ingredient rather than boost it up. I did play with the ingredients a bit: Foose asks for green cabbage, but I love purple cabbage.
I also put green apple in mine to make it a bit sweeter for the kiddos.
Our neighbors came over one night and they piled the stuff on top of grilled flank steak, wrapped inside a lettuce leaf, for a simple version of the presently very trendy Korean taco.
Whatever you put this 3-Day slaw on will better for it, at least I think so.

Recipe for 3-Day Cole Slaw
-In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine 1 cup of apple cider vinegar, 1/4 cup of honey, 1 tsp dry mustard, 1 tsp celery seeds and 1 1/2 tsp of salt. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat and add 1 cup of vegetable oil. Cool until just warm to the touch, about 30 minutes.
-In a large bowl combine 1 small head of purple cabbage that’s been shredded, 1 small white or vidalia onion that’s been thinly sliced, 1 granny smith apple that’s been thinly sliced, 1 peeled carrot that’s been grated or shredded.
-Pour the warm dressing over the cabbage mixture. Cover and marinate for 8 hours, refrigerated, or up to three days.

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