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Simple Buckwheat Crepes: Perfect for Summer Eating

By brooklynsupper |

In the States, crepes are almost always sweet, but in France they’re often savory as well. They’re both excellent, and the beauty of these buckwheat crepes is that they work equally well for either purpose. When we made these this past weekend, we prepared a bunch, had sweet crepes for breakfast, put the rest in the fridge and had savory crepes for lunch.

Crepes can take a while to get the hang of but once you’ve made a few, they’re really no harder than pancakes. Still, if it’s your first time making crepes, count on the first two or three being experiments. Our recipe recommends that you allow the batter to sit overnight, as that lends greater pliability. Don’t expect creperie quality the first few times–just do your best and you’ll get the hang of it.

Having a big stack of pre-made crepes in your fridge or freezer makes for a host of quick lunch options. Simply heat and add mushrooms and Swiss, sauteed greens, or a simple fruit and yogurt filling.

Classic Buckwheat Crepes (adapted from David Lebovitz)
makes 20 or so crepes

3 large eggs
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
2 cups whole milk
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

In a medium bowl, lightly whisk the eggs. Then whisk in all of the remaining ingredients. Cover bowl and chill overnight.

Set the batter out to come to room temperature for an hour before cooking. Preheat a large 10” skillet over medium-high heat. Add a small pat of butter and use a paper towel to quickly spread the butter around the pan. Add 1/4 cup of batter and tilt the pan so that the batter spreads into a circle. Cook each side for 1 – 2 minutes, or until golden brown. Unused crepes can easily be stored wrapped in the fridge for a couple of days, or frozen for several months.

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About brooklynsupper

brooklynsupper

brooklynsupper

Elizabeth Stark and Brian Campbell write the blog Brooklyn Supper, dedicated to seasonal ingredients and wholesome home cooking. Read bio and latest posts → Read Elizabeth's latest posts →

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