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Star-Shaped Fourth of July Doughnut Holes and Rings


Nothing screams Independence Day quite like stars. Sure, the colors are there, but when you live in Twins Baseball territory, the red, white and blue theme is an everyday occurrence, especially come summer. It’s the appearance of the actual stars and stripes that sets the Fourth of July apart…and the fireworks.

Remember those red, white and blue jelly-filled donut holes from earlier? Well, these are the product of that same Fourth of July baking session. I had originally considered making all star doughnuts, but I was afraid that they wouldn’t hold the jam quite as well. Really, though, they were fine, and AND I tried my hand at frying up a proper ring-style doughnut with a star cut out, and it worked!

Star-Shaped Fourth of July Doughnut Holes and Rings

oil for frying
2 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup sour cream
3/4 cup heavy cream

Heat 4-5”³ oil in a medium-sized saucepan to 350 degrees F. Sift flour, baking powder, salt and sugar into a large bowl. Mix in sour cream and then fold in heavy cream to make a soft dough. If the dough seems a bit dry, add in a bit more cream, one tablespoon at a time.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and roll out until it is 3/4-1”³ high. Using a large biscuit cutter, cut out 4-5″ rounds from the dough. In the middle of each round, cut out a 2″ star shape.

Fry stars for 60-90 seconds in 350-degree oil or until golden brown, and then flip and fry an additional 60 seconds. Drain on a wire rack with a brown paper bag. Fry the rounds by carefully lowering them into the oil so they stay in tact, and frying for the same length of time and possibly 20 seconds or so more if they aren’t browning quite as fast.

Dip tops in a light glaze or toss with sugar.

Makes 10-12 of both rings and stars.

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