The Financially Fit Shopper: 7 Ways to Eat Well & Save Money in the Grocery Store

Spring Recipes

Financial fitness is just as important as physical fitness when grocery shopping for your family. It is important, of course, to buy healthy foods, but it is not a good idea to buy things that are so expensive that they break the bank and leave you scrimping on other essentials. Luckily, with a few simple tips and tricks it is possible to eat healthy AND save money in the grocery store. I’ve rounded up a few of my favorite tips for keeping financially fit when grocery shopping. Hopefully these will help you save some extra money for a rainy day or to put toward your holiday meal while still serving up healthy family food.


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  • Shop the Outside of the Store 1 of 7
    Shop the Outside of the Store
    Shop the outside aisles of the store first, they have the cheapest and healthiest food. For example, buy a bunch of bananas to make healthy and fun banana based treats, skip the artificially flavored (and expensive!) banana cereal in the center aisle.
    As Livestrong notes in their tips for grocery shopping, the outside perimeter of the store usually contains healthy fruits and vegetables.
  • Make Pantry Staples at Home 2 of 7
    Make Pantry Staples at Home
    Pantry staples are usually located in the center aisles and can be very expensive. Save money by buying the ingredients in the outer aisles and making them at home instead. They will be cheaper AND healthier! Homemade marinara sauce, for example, costs less than $1.50 to make, but the average jar costs $4 at the grocery store. Pancake mix can be made at home for less than $3, but the average box in the cereal aisle costs $5.
    Make these 10 pantry staples at home
  • Plan Your Menus to Reduce Impulse Purchases 3 of 7
    Plan Your Menus to Reduce Impulse Purchases
    Planning menus and making shopping lists helps reduce impulse purchase at the store. Plan way ahead for big holidays so you can begin strategizing your budget for the pricier holiday season.
    Check out these tips for efficiently planning your menus
  • Use Coupon Apps and Circulars 4 of 7
    Use Coupon Apps and Circulars
    Money-saving apps, coupons, and circulars are always helpful ways to save money. Review your circulars weekly and buy sale items like dried pastas in bulk to save money.
    Check out some of these amazing money-saving apps
  • Shop Seasonal Produce 5 of 7
    Shop Seasonal Produce
    Seasonal produce is always the cheapest in the fresh produce section. Focus your recipe planning on what is season to incorporate the least expensive, healthiest food possible.
    As Mint.com says, seasonal produce is cheaper because there is more of it to sell. Stores will push down prices to move stock and you should take advantage!
  • When to Buy Organic, When to Skip It 6 of 7
    When to Buy Organic, When to Skip It
    Organic foods are healthy, but can also be very expensive. To save money stick to buying the dirty dozen and buy the rest in their regular state. Strawberries and apples are among the worst offenders, they are often coated in pesticides if not purchased organic, so be sure to buy only the organic varieties whenever possible.
    Check out the dirty dozen to make sure you are buying the right organic produce
  • Whole Wheat Couscous 7 of 7
    Whole Wheat Couscous
    Dry grains like couscous, quinoa, and rice can often be purchased in bulk. At my local store the same amount of rice in a 1lb box that costs $2 can be purchased for $1.45. This amount can feed a family for four for up to three meals. Whole grains can be the base of many healthy meals and store well for long periods. Buy them in large quantities and store them in mason jars to save money and ensure you always have healthy ingredients on hand.
    Make whole wheat couscous


Some more interesting posts:

7 Healthy Sources of Iron

8 New Ways to Bake Eggs for Breakfast

10 Simple Healthy Spring Recipes to Teach Kids Cooking

Photo: Laura Levy

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