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Traditional Passover Recipes: Charoset

Charoset for Passover
Charoset for Passover

There are plenty of traditional Passover recipes – but not a lot of them are as healthy as this one – which is packed with fruit and nuts! This was my first time making (and even hearing about) the traditional Passover dish: Charoset. I researched the ‘traditional’ recipe and made a few tweaks to call it my own. I blended crushed nuts with spices, citrus, agave (as my sticky sweetener) and plenty of crisp tart diced apples. The traditional recipe also calls for a splash of red wine. Interesting, right? To be honest, I had no idea how this muesli or granola-like concoction would turn out. But once I blended the ingredients and took a taste, I was thrilled with the results, in fact I chowed down on an entire bowl-ful. Bring on this traditional Passover Recipe…

fruit and nut Passover recipe
fruit and nut Passover recipe
Garnish with citrus - charoset
Garnish with citrus - charoset

Have you ever made Charoset for Passover? What’s your fave recipe? There are several variations. Some include figs, apricots, coconut, dried fruit, walnuts only, mixed nuts, brown sugar, honey, apples, lemon, grapefruit, candied nuts and more.

I chose to tone down the sweetener just a tad. But if you want a stickier, thicker, paste-like texture you can add in a few more tablespoons of sweetener. And use honey – which is slightly stickier than agave syrup.

charoset ingredients
charoset ingredients

What is Charoset exactly?

Wiki says: “Charoset, haroset, or charoses is a sweet, dark-colored, chunky paste made of fruits and nuts served primarily during the Passover Seder. Its color and texture are meant to recall the mortar. The word “charoset” comes from the Hebrew word cheres — חרס — “clay.”

Before eating the maror — in the present day generally horseradish or romaine lettuce— participants dip the maror into the charoset and then shake off the charoset before eating the maror. This action symbolises how hard the Israelites worked in Egypt, combining a food that brings tears to the eyes (the maror) with one that resembles the mortar used to build Egyptian cities and storehouses (the charoset).

Despite its symbolism, the charoset is a tasty concoction and is a favorite of children. During the Seder meal, it may be eaten liberally, often spread on matzah.”

Citrus Spice Charoset
makes 4-5 cups

2 1/2 cups assorted raw nuts, chopped/pulverized (pistachios, walnuts, almonds, cashews, hazelnuts)
1 green apple, peeled/diced (about 1 1/2 cups diced)
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp cayenne
1/4 tsp ginger powder
1/4 tsp sea salt
2-3 Tbsp agave syrup (or honey or maple syrup)
3-4 Tbsp red wine
1 tbsp orange juice
1/4 cup tiny orange slices (plus extra for garnish)
1/4 tsp orange zest – grated over top

Directions

1. Prep your nuts by pulverizing them in a high speed blender or food processor. The nuts should be very finely ground – a few chunkier bits are a nice touch. Peel and dice your apple and slice your orange.

2. Combine all the ingredients in a large mixing bowl and toss well. Plate in your serving bowl and grate orange zest over top.

3. Chill until ready to serve. Serve with matzah, romaine lettice leaves and a garnish of orange slices and horseradish.

Citrus Spice Charoset
Citrus Spice Charoset
Charoset for Passover
Charoset for Passover

For even more Passover recipes check out these 8 classic dishes with clever spins

Article Posted 4 years Ago
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