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Using {Frozen} Yogurt to Introduce New Foods


My kids love their yogurt. It’s one of the first foods we gave them as infants, and because it’s been around daily since they were young, it’s an easy snack. We add it to smoothies, pack it in lunch boxes, eat it for an after-school snack. Still, one of my favorite yogurt uses is as ice cream.

In the dead of summer, nothing quite compares to the silky smooth of a good frozen yogurt topped with the freshest berries and fruits summer has to offer.

Treating yogurt like dessert is one of my favorite mommy moments. I’ll freeze tubes of it or toss flavored Greek yogurt into our ice cream maker until it’s frozen like soft serve. The kids think it’s magic ice cream, and I know it’s just plain good. Plus, a bowl of ice cream is a great way to introduce new fruits and textures to small mouths.

Pairing new fruits like peach chunks or mangoes with a bowl of something familiar like frozen (or non-frozen) yogurt is a great way to get them to accept them without a huge fight. With the treat at center stage, it doesn’t become a battle over the new “scary” food, but rather a way to enjoy something different.

Making Frozen Yogurt
2 cups flavored Greek yogurt like Stonyfield YoKids Greek
or
2 cups plain Greek yogurt
1/2 cup fruit preserves

Add yogurt to ice cream maker. Freeze as directed. Serve as soft serve immediately or transfer to freezer and freeze until firm.

A big thanks to YoBaby for sponsoring this campaign. Click here to see more of the discussion.

**Read more from Shaina on Food for My Family! Follow Shaina on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest for updates!

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More on Family Kitchen:
10 Diet Foods that Will Make You Fat!
The Case for Grass-Fed, Organic Beef and Dairy: More than Pink Slime Avoidance
Why I Grocery Shop with My Kids (and Think You Should, Too)

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