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America's Next Top Model Cycle 15: High Fashion or Wrong Message?

America's Next Top Model Cycle 15 Tyra Banks and influential fashion editor, André Leon Talley, celebrated America’s Next Top Model  premiere at Marea in New York City. 

Now in its fifteenth cycle, you would think it’s time for Tyra Banks to stop “smizing” already and retire the show.  But Tyra and her crew have breathed new life into the show, making this cycle more “high fashion”.

Once again, Tyra and her crew wittled down their pool of tall, thin beauties to just the right group of 14 tall, thin beauties whom they’ll test, tweak and mold until one is crowned a Top Model.

Several of the world’s top designers (Diane Von Furstenberg, Zac Posen, Roberto Cavalli) photographers (Patrick Demarchelier, Matthew Rolston) and fashion’s elite (Vogue Italia’s Franca Sozzani, supermodel Karolina Kurkova), all lend their expertise and vision as guest judges on the show.

This time, there is no “plus-sized” model.  Not even one. Great way to shut out a whole bunch of teenage girls out there.  What’s the reason, Tyra?  Not “high-fashion” enough for you?

Instead, we’re finding even thinner girls out there.  For example, Ann.  Her waist is the size of my wrist!  And Tyra’s reaction to seeing her?  “For some reason I really like this girl!”

Ann credits her 6’2″ figure to a fast metabolism.  Her tiny waist, that Mr. Jay wrapped two hands around?  Perhaps a few missing ribs.

The one girl who actually could break the mold, the smartest, unique-looking girl on the show, Jordan, was given the boot.  When she wasn’t chosen, Jordan was bawling.  Tyra’s reaction?  Pathetic. 

In a dumbfounded look, she says, “I’m shocked, I didn’t think you wanted it!”   Yeah, you didn’t want a girl with brains on the show.

Is this what we want to give young girls another reason to feel bad about their bodies by having Ann?  And also giving the boot to the smart girl?  Is ANTM once again, sending the wrong message to our girls?

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