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Anastasia Romanov: What Really Happened To Her?

Anastasia Romanov

What Happened To Anastasia Romanov?

The legend of what really happened to Anastasia Romanov is a story that has haunted people for decades. Anastasia Romanov was the Grand Duchess of Russia, and her father Nicholas was Tsar of Russia.

The Romanov family was brutally killed by the Bolsheviks in 1918, but it has long been rumored that Anastasia Romanov somehow managed to escape the attacks and survived. For years, people everywhere have been wondering what really happened to Anastasia Romanov, and whether she perished with her family or is still alive and well somewhere.

Several theories have emerged on Anastasia Romanov’s fate.

Between 1920 and 1922, a woman named Anna Anderson claimed to be Anastasia Romanov, and said that she had escaped the Bolsheviks by faking her death. She said that a guard saw that she was still alive and helped her escape. A court concluded that there was not enough evidence to prove that she was Anastasia Romanov. Anna Anderson passed away in 1984, and DNA tests confirmed that she was not Anastasia.

After Anna Anderson, at least 10 other women claimed to be Anastasia, but all were proven to be impostors.

In 1998, the Imperial family’s remains were examined, and the skeleton who was buried under the name Anastasia did not match up with the real Anastasia Romanov’s height at the time of her assumed passing. It wasn’t until information surfaced that two of the bodies had been moved to an undisclosed location that all members of the family found.

Anastasia Romanov’s whereabouts remained a mystery until 2007, when a Russian archaeologist found two partially burned skeletons who matched the profile of Anastasia and one of her brothers. DNA testing was conducted, and in 2009, the bones were proven to be that of one of the Romanov sisters, and Alexei Romanov.

The discovery of these remains left all of the Imperial Family accounted for, proving that Anastasia Romanov did indeed lose her life with her parents and siblings in 1918.

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