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Former MLB Star Roger Clemens Indicted for Perjury: Example to Kids?

Former Major League Baseball star Roger Clemens was indicted today for lying to Congress. Apparently, he lied when asked if he ever used performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) while playing baseball, with his story failing to match that of his former trainer and even a former teammate who said, under oath, that Clemens had admitted using PEDs. Clemens, who played with the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Toronto Blue Jays, and Houston Astros during his storied career, is just one of a long line of professional athletes that have been accused of using steroids, including Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez (who recently hit his 600th home run) and bicycle champ Lance Armstrong.

No date has been set for his trial, but the pitcher (who garnered baseball’s top pitching honor, the Cy Young Award, a record 7 times) and 48-year-old father of four (including son Coby, who plays on the Houston Astros farm team) faces jail time and a hefty fine if found guilty.

With all this talk of steroids and records, you have to think, what example is this showing kids, especially ones with dreams of playing professional sports?

It’s well-known that performance-enhancing drugs are banned throughout most professional sports, yet these guys seem to slip under the testing radar and continue to play (and put up monster numbers) while cheating. The home run leader in all of baseball, Barry Bonds, will go on trial early next year for his role in lying to Congress about using steroids, yet his numbers and records still stand, and he will probably be inducted to the Hall of Fame as soon as he’s eligible. Why? Are we teaching our kids that cheating is okay, by continuing to herald these sports stars long after it’s been revealed that they used drugs to up their performances?

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