Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Halloween Trivia: Test Your Older Kids' Knowledge with Fun Halloween Facts

Halloween Trivia

Halloween Trivia

Halloween is this Sunday!  Are you quizzing your kids about Halloween trivia?

Here are some great facts and trivia to know.

Pumpkins are not just orange!  They come in white, blue and green too.

Black and orange are the traditional Halloween colors and represent the darkness of night and the color of bonfires, autumn leaves, and jack-o’-lanterns.

Black cats were once believed to be witch’s familiars who protected their powers.

There are real vampire bats, but they’re not from Transylvania. They live in Central and South America and feed on the blood of cattle, horses and birds.

Chocolate candy bars top the list as the most popular candy for trick-or-treaters.

The Ouija Board ended up outselling the game of Monopoly in its first full year at Salem. Over two million copies of the Ouija Board were shipped.

Halloween is the 2nd most commercially successful holiday, with Christmas being the first.

In 1962, the Count Dracula Society was founded.

Jack o’ Lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed-out turnips to keep away spirits and ghosts on the Samhain holiday.

Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes.

Bobbing for apples is thought to have originated from the roman harvest festival that honors Pamona, the goddess of fruit trees.

The day after Halloween is called All Saints’ Day or All Hallows’ Day.

Before the end of the 19th century, the Greeks believed that the corpses of werewolves, if not destroyed, would return to life as vampires in the form of wolves.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest