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How the Gosselins are Like Geese: An Exposé

Yesterday, I had a truly astounding moment of motherhood. My son was listening to a Pete Seeger CD of kids’ songs, and I heard the following lyrics:

“He was flying over the ocean, Lord, Lord, Lord”¨
With a long string of Gosselins, Lord, Lord, Lord”

“*^&%^&%!!!” I thought. “Pete Seeger is singing about the Gosselins! On a CD made in 1998!” Given the flight reference, I assumed that the Seeg must be a big fan of the Gosselins’ Family-Vacation-In-Hawaii episode. Then, on second listen, I realized this: Pete Seeger is actually  singing about goselings. Not Gosselins. Goselings, the fancy name for baby geese.

And hence, today’s post from the dark side: How the Gosselins are like gesse. Read on, if you dare…

1. “In recent years, Canada Geese populations in some areas have grown substantially, so much so that many consider them pests,” according to Wikipedia. Also in recent years, Gosselin population has risen substantially. And, in fact, I know plenty of people who consider them “pests.”

2. Adult geese often lead their goslings in a line. Adult Gosselins often lead their baby Gosselins in a line.

3. Adult geese are known to be violently possessive of their spawn, and chase away predators.They also sometimes act in a hostile manner. And Gosselins? See picture at right.

 4. They’re all so cute! Except during mating season (geese) and sweeps season (Gosselins).

5. Geese are monogamous and most meet their mates early in life—and then stay with these mates until they die. Gosselins meet their mates early and…oh, whoops… 

Got any gooselike behavior to add? 

Photo: INF Photo

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