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Kathie Lee Gifford's Son Lands On-Air Internship. Is Nepotism Good Or Can It Harm Your Child's Career?

Kathie Lee Gifford’s son Cody, who’s name you first heard if you watched her regale Regis with a million stories about him back on Live, has landed a summer internship at the Today Show. He’s reviewing movies and giving such profound insight as “Toy Story 3 “is definitely a winner” on the air-something unheard of in a world where getting coffee and proving you know the alphabet with filing skills is usually the most one can hope for. 

Cody is majoring in film studies at the University of Southern California and his mother has no problem broadcasting his exact reason for being on TV.  “I love nepotism!” she said by way of introduction. 

“Is he getting an opportunity here? Yeah, but so be it. We like him and he’s a smart kid and a good kid,” said the Today Show producer. As to the nepotism, he says, “Let’s be fair, I completely understand that sentiment. It’s not like we’re in dire need of a movie reviewer.”

So is it fair to rob TV viewers of another candidate who would be better just because his mother works for the show? Now, I believe in helping your kid out to land a job or internship, especially in this economy, but is this too much?  Cody is cute for a twenty year old, but his on-screen presence isn’t there. He needs practice, experience, growth-all things he’ll get with this internship…except he’ll be doing it in front of the public eye. Internships are meant to be a place where you mess up, learn and prepare yourself for your eventual career. Will putting him in front of an audience too soon alter people’s perceptions of him in the future? First impressions count and can follow someone throughout their career.

What do you think? Is nepotism a good thing? Is this level of it ultimately harmful?

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