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Roger Staubach Presents The Vince Lombardi Trophy; 5 Trophy Facts

Who had the honor of handing the Vince Lombardi trophy (aka the Super Bowl trophy) over to the Green Bay Packers tonight? Roger Staubach was the lucky guy. And who is Roger Staubach?

Roger is the executive chairman of Chicago-based commercial real estate services firm Jones Lang LaSalle. If you’re a football fan, you’ll also know that he was the quarterback who led the Dallas Cowboys to victories in Super Bowl VI and Super Bowl XII.

An interesting fact? Staubach actually picked the Packers to win! You can mark my word: The Packers will prevail.” Although Staubach lost Super Bowls X and XIII to the Steelers in the 1970s, he had this to say about his pick: “I have nothing but the utmost respect and admiration for the Steelers and the city of Pittsburgh,” he says. “But the numbers don’t lie. The Lombardi Trophy is going back to TitleTown USA.”

As I’ve said before, I’m a fan of random trivia, and I was interested in learning more about the Vince Lombardi trophy. Here are five interesting facts about the trophy:

Since 1967, the Super Bowl trophy has been awarded to winning franchises, starting from the time when the Super Bowl was still known as the AFL-NFL World Championship Game.

In 1970 the trophy was renamed as the Vince Lombardi Trophy, in honor of the former Green Bay Packers head coach who died from cancer.

The trophy is designed and manufactured by Tiffany & Co. It stands at 22 inches tall and weighs about 7 pounds. It’s made from sterling silver, and depicts a regulation-size ball fixed in kicking position. The value of the Vince Lombardi trophy is $25,000.

The estimated time to create this kind of special trophy is 4 months and 72 hours.

Today, the NFL team that holds the most number of Vince Lombardi Trophies is the Pittsburgh Steelers, which owns six.

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