Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

SpongeBob SquarePants: SpongeBob's Runaway Roadtrip DVD Not Good for Kids?

Spongebob SquarePants SpongeBob's Runaway Road Trip

Is SpongeBob SquarePants bad for your kids?

In SpongeBob SquarePants’ latest adventure, SpongeBob and Patrick take a little vacation road trip – look for the DVD release of “SpongeBob’s Runaway Roadtrip” on September 20, with the special set to air on Nickelodeon in November.

The SpongeBob’s Runaway Roadtrip DVD also includes bonus episodes “Hide and Then What Happens?” and “Shellback Shenanigans.”

SpongeBob SquarePants is under fire after a new study found that watching just nine minutes of SpongeBob can cause learning problems in 4-year-olds.

Sixty kids in the study watched either SpongeBob SquarePants or Caillou or had to draw pictures. The assignments lasted nine minutes, following which, the kids took tests to determine their mental function. (Note that the kids were not tested prior to the nine minute assignments.)

Yep, those watching SpongeBob did somewhat worse than the others, with the study finding that watching TV can lead to long-term attention problems with kids.

The researchers assert that watching a full episode “could be more detrimental,” however, they have yet to do a study so they can’t confirm it.

SpongeBob wasn’t the only culprit, as other “fast-paced cartoon programming” is also an issue.

Nickelodeon spokesman David Bittler said SpongeBob SquarePants isn’t intended for 4-year-olds, rather it’s aimed at the 6-14 set.

Bittler argues, “Having 60 non-diverse kids, who are not part of the show’s targeted (audience), watch nine minutes of programming is questionable methodology and could not possibly provide the basis for any valid findings that parents could trust.”

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest