Tyler Clementi Sought Help Before Suicide. Did School Act Fast Enough?

Just when you thought the tragic story of Tyler Clementi, the Rutger’s student who jumped to his death after his roommate live streamed video of him engagement in physical activity with another male student, could not get any sadder, it of course, does. Clementi had asked for help.

The day before jumping off the bridge, a person believed to be Clementi logged onto the chat room Justusboys.com’s under an alias. There he documented his situation, saying “I’m kinda pissed at him,” in regards to his roommate. “It would be nice to get him into trouble … I feel like the only thing the school might do is find me another roommate … and I’d probably just end up with somebody worse than him.”

“I mean aside from being an a———e from time to time, he’s a pretty decent roommate.”

In another post: “the fact that the people he was with saw my making out with a guy as the scandal, whereas I mean come on…he was SPYING ON ME…do they see something wrong with this?” And another: “Revenge never ends well for me. As much as I would love to pour pink paint all over his stuff … that would just let him win.”

On the day of his death Tyler write this: "So I wanted to have the guy over again. I texted roomie around 7 asking for the room later tonite and he said it was fine. When I got back to the room, I instantly noticed he had turned the webcam toward my bed and he had posted online again … saying…’Anyone want a free show just video chat with me tonight.’ "

Tyler then went to an RA in his dorm and later wrote that they took his concerns seriously. “He asked me to email him a written paragraph about exactly what happened. I emailed it to him and to two people above him.”

But Tyler didn’t wait for action to be taken. Instead he jumped off the bridge. The school was by the looks of it going to act when they had reviewed his complaint. Should they have acted faster? I don;t think so. Unless they had some way to know this was a dire emergency, they seemed to be looking into it.

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