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6 Very Simple DIY Science Experiments

Ziploc science experiments

Did you ever do science experiments in school? I LOVED them! Especially the small DIY ones that I could do around my house with simple supplies. I was a huge fan of Mr. Wizard – remember him?! The good news is that I’ve found those same fun science experiments that are easy to re-enact, and they all have one ingredient in common: the Ziploc bag. The leakproof bag is a classic one, accomplished by stabbing pencils and/or other sharp objects through a Ziploc filled with water. Looking for more great DIY science projects to do with the kids? Click through the jump to see them!

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  • Exploding Bag 1 of 5
    Exploding Bag
    Combine baking soda and vinegar for a fun chemical reaction that causes a Ziploc bag to bust - do this experiment outside!
    Learn more at IMCPL Kids
  • Moldy Bread 2 of 5
    Moldy Bread
    Kids can learn about fungi by placing a piece of bread in a Ziploc and observing the changes over the course of several days.
    Learn more at Small World at Home
  • Living Yeast 3 of 5
    Living Yeast
    Show children how yeast is alive by mixing it with lukewarm water in a Ziploc and then observing under a microscope.
    Learn how at Education.com
  • Ice Cream 4 of 5
    Ice Cream
    Watch a scientific reaction as three ingredients turn to ice cream when placed on ice and salt, over the course of five minutes.
    Learn more at How Stuff Works
  • Pinto Beans 5 of 5
    Pinto Beans
    Kids will be amazed that all it takes is a wet paper towel and pinto beans inside of a Ziploc to grow small plants.
    Learn more at Lightbulb Books

 

 

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