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Needlepoint Round Three: A Good Library Of Needlepoint Projects

I just sunk a solid hour and a half tonight on reading reviews on the different embroidery books available on Amazon. (I even forgot to eat dinner!) All so I could bring you round three of my mini needlework series (which I do sincerely hope you’ve enjoyed thus far): A Good (Great!) Library Of Needlepoint Projects.

Are you ready?


  • Doodle Stitching 1 of 6
    Doodle Stitching
    Simple projects for beginners who are interested in some fresh, new embroidery designs.
  • Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches 2 of 6
    Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches
    This is the kind of book all stitchers need, beginners or not. A rundown of the commonly used stitches, so you'll never find yourself looking at pattern and thinking, "But what on earth does LSS even mean?!?"
  • The New Crewel 3 of 6
    The New Crewel
    This one has such good reviews, it is even praised in the review sections of other embroidery books! Crewelwork is beautiful and traditional, and what you are typically looking at when you're drooling over an ornate pillow at Anthropologie, so, you're gonna want this one.
  • Woolly Embroidery 4 of 6
    Woolly Embroidery
    Okay, those Japanese are the MASTERS of crafts, are they not? And just by the cover image alone, I feel like I MUST own this one. But keep in mind, sometimes the Japanese aesthetic is often different from our own, and reviewers say this book is filled with country cutesy type patterns. And the directions have been translated from Japanese to English, so there may be some bits that are lost in the translation. Think you're up for the challenge?
  • 100 Embroidery Stitches 5 of 6
    100 Embroidery Stitches
    Another basic how-to book, to keep your French knots looking extra Frenchy.
  • 18th Century Embroidery Techniques 6 of 6
    18th Century Embroidery Techniques
    History/craft nerds aren't even going to need persuading. This book is rad. You're going to want this because obviously 18th Century style embroidering is incredibly useful in today's society. Reviewers describe it as "awe inspiring," but then, you knew that already.

Sources:

Doodle Stitching, by Aimee Ray

Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches, by Mary Thomas

The New Crewel, by Katherine Shaughnessy

Woolly Embroidery

100 Embroidery Stitches, by Coats & Clark

18th Century Embroidery Techniques, by Gail Marsh

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