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Best Dad Books for Fathers Day

fatherhoodIt’s been an absolute banner year when it comes to dad books.

From memoirs to craft books to inspirational resources for new dads, 2013 is shaping up to be the year of the literary dad.

I remember a time, not too long ago, when publishers wouldn’t touch so-called dad books. They just wouldn’t sell, publishers argued. So it’s heartening to see so many dad-inspired stories flood the market. And just in time!

As Fathers Day approaches, here are a few new books and must haves for the involved dad in your life.

The Guide to Baby Sleep Positions: The absolute best of the bunch for anyone who is going through or at least remembers the bliss of co-sleeping. I used to think it would be sweet and warm and gentle, until a swift kick to the ribs proved me wrong. This book truly captures the pain, hilarity, and heart of cuddling with the kids. A must by Charlie Capan and Andy Herald from How to Be a Dad!

Dad is Fat: Comedian Jim Gaffigan is taking the book world by storm with his stories about raising five kids in an New York City apartment and behind-the-scenes accounts of his hilarious stand-up routines, but I bought this based on the word-of-mouth from a good friend who has worked with Jim and said the dude is just an awesome dad and a great guy. I love when good things happen to good people, and this book does not disappoint.

FYI: Great-Grandma Is Racist — This hilarious e-book from Dos Bad Dads unearths some serious family guilt in a way that makes baby books not suck while at the same time opening doors for healthy dialogue. This is pure genius in the way that all the great parenting books are: humor and message together again. Love it.

Dad or Alive: Confessions of a stay-at-home dad: Adrian Kulp, once a big-shot TV executive, suddenly found himself at home, taking care of the house and the kids. This is a spot-on memoir of growing up and growing into the role of dad. Adrian is a fierce proponent of fatherhood and this is a charming, hilarious account of parenting that reads like something from a good friend.

Made By Dad: 67 Blueprints for Making Cool Stuff: Scott Bedford has come up with some incredibly crafty DIY projects that will just absolutely blow your kid’s lid. From the light that looks like a 1-ton weight to a bunk bed speaker system that would send any child into fits of joy, there’s a ton of great projects in here to enjoy together for years to come. A must for the fun dad and crafty kids.

Wisdom from Daddies: Ricky Shetty’s new book on the best advice from fellow dads will be released on Fathers day. Perfect timing! Knowing Shetty, this will be a must-read for all dads.

Chronicles of a Full-Time Father: James Ninness expertly weaves tales of his first year of parenting. Witty, touching, funny, you’ll love it. Great for any dad thinking about staying home.

Dude to Dad: Hugh Weber’s insightful commentary based on his helpful web site of the same name — in which he helps guys make the coolest transition of all.

Someone Could Get Hurt: a Memoir of 21st Century Parenthood: Drew Magary wins this year’s title battle, because who doesn’t remember hearing that phrase while roughhousing? I laughed out loud at so many parts of this book that I lost count — an absolute perfect guide to all the incredible, anxiety-inducing zaniness of raising kids today by a fabulous writer and one cool dad.

I Just Want to Pee Alone: A compilation of essays on parenthood from scores of self-styled kick-ass mom bloggers. There were so many stories in here that had me in stitches that I could not resist sharing. For dads who want a different take on parenting from across the gender aisle, this should be the go-to guidebook. Hilarious.

 

Dad's book of awesome projectsMike Adamick writes at Cry It Out! and is the author of Dad’s Book of Awesome Projects – a new family craft book designed to get families playing and tinkering together.

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