Dad Hacks Donkey Kong and Displays the Skills He Uses at Work to His Daughter

nintendoOver the weekend I spent one of my evenings watching Wreck-It Ralph with my wife. Casey and Addie watched Wreck-It Ralph when it was still in the movie theater and Casey vowed to own the movie the first day it came available on DVD, and she wasn’t lying. The first day the movie was available on DVD Casey went out to Target and picked up a copy and brought it home. In those few days after Casey brought the movie home, Addie watched it about a dozen times.

The movie is pretty impressive and it brought back a lot of memories I had of playing video games as a kid. One thing I found pretty interesting was when King Candy enters into the Sugar Rush’s digital code to change the way that game is played. It was a pretty good way of allowing kids, and people like me, an idea of how video games are created.

Another dad over the weekend decided to play with a game’s code as well. This dad decided to break into the coding of Donkey Kong and reprogram the game so that his daughter could play as the princess instead of being forced to play as Mario. When I first read about what that dad did, all I could picture him doing was entering a secret code on his Nintendo game paddle and then swimming through Donkey Kong‘s code as he unplugged some code here and plugged in some other code there–just as King Candy did in Wreck-It Ralph.

That kind of ability is way beyond my level of expertise. I once programed a TI-80 calculator to help me cheat on a math test, but that is the extent of my programming ability.

This dad took the opportunity to show his daughter what he does for a living. This guy is a director at Other Ocean Interactive–a software game developer company. Now that he has shown his daughter what he is capable of doing, I’m sure his daughter is only going to be that much more impressed with what he does for his family and how he got to be successful.

I’ve tried to find ways that I can show Addie what I do for a living. I’d like her to understand what I do. Not because I want her to become a lawyer, but because I want her to have a little better grasp on what I go through so she can have a room to live in (maybe she’ll stop stuffing all of her stuff under her bed). The last time I asked her what lawyers do she told me, “They sit in an office and make money.” I wish.

I’ve taken Addie to the courtroom while court was in session so she could see the judge sit up on the stand while wearing his black robe. Because I work in a small courthouse, each of the judges would have recognized me, and called my daughter up to the witness chair to explain to her what goes on in the courtroom, but Addie got bored in about 20 seconds after stepping foot into the courtroom and the judges never have the chance to get the invitation out before I was chasing Addie out the door.

Talking to her about my times going to jail to visit with clients doesn’t get her interested either. She’ll now tell her friends in a very nonchalant way, “My dad went to jail again today.” And Casey wonders why the parents of one of Addie’s friends don’t want their kid to have a sleep over at our house.

Casey is gone on a trip to L.A. this week leaving me to take care of Addie each day after school. I asked Addie yesterday on our way home from work if she wanted to go to the courthouse with me one day this week to talk to some of the judges and she seemed really excited, so maybe there’s hope.

Are your kids interested in what you do for a living?

Photo Credit: Flickr

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