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Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax Reveals Secret About Seuss

I was doing some research on Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax movie coming out later this week (did you know it was banned at one point? That always works so well …), and I stumbled upon something half the world probably knows about already even though my jaw dropped to the floor.

Really? I thought. When did that happen?

I’ve been a Seuss fan all my life, as probably millions of us were, and now that my daughter is grabbing books by the horn, it’s incredibly heartening to see her slip into a Dr. Seuss book. But each time she does it now, or each time I pick up a book for bed time or chill time, or even each time I write his name in this very post, I can’t believe I’ve been saying his name wrong all these years.

Dr. Seuss, apparently, is pronounced not like goose but rather like voice.

Dr. Soice.

Did you know that? Has the joke simply been on me all this time?

I thought it was just a crazy Internet rumors — one of those things you can find online in two seconds to verify your every whim: “Bat Boy Marries Marilyn – it’s true!” — but I found the official Dr. Seuss site at Random House books, his publisher, and it confirmed the little fact:

If you want to pronounce the name the way his family did, say Zoice, not Soose. Seuss is a Bavarian name, and was his mother’s maiden name: Henrietta Seuss’s parents emigrated from Bavaria (part of modern-day Germany) in the nineteenth century. Seuss was also his middle name.”

Huh. Who knew? (Well, I suppose anyone who speaks German, or maybe linguists, or someone who read the official Dr. Seuss biography or lots of other people probably.)

But still. Dr. Seuss like voice seems too cemented into the fabric of our culture to change now. Even knowing how to say it properly, I still call him Dr. Seuss like goose.

A big thanks to Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax for sponsoring this campaign. Click here to see more of the discussion.

Photo: Expressions blog

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