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The Importance of Parent’s Being Affectionate in Front of Their Kids

kissIn college, my wife and I worked as editors of our school’s yearbook. It was a good campus job that paid well and allowed us to use our talents. We really enjoyed working together and being able to spend so much time with each other. Throughout our shifts, we’d express our affection with hugs and kisses.

Apparently, our PDA didn’t sit well with the rest of the staff. Our Editor-in-Chief called a meeting to discuss the situation. My wife and I sat on one side of the room while the rest of the staff surrounded us. They all complained that our displays of affection were making them uncomfortable. My wife and I were a bit surprised by this intervention, but we agreed to tone it down.

Fast forward several years.

My wife and I continue to openly show our affection towards each other. And once again, a group of naysayers are offended by our behavior. However, the complaining parties are no longer college students, they’re our own kids.

Every day, my wife and I greet each other with a kiss, slow dance in the kitchen, or embrace on the couch while watching television. The kids often try to wedge themselves between us or push us apart. When we pucker up, we’re greeted by a chorus of “EWWWWWWWWWs!” My two younger sons snicker in the background while my daughter rolls her eyes and whispers, “Get a room.”

Although they find our PDA disgusting, we refuse to “tone it down.” We believe that it is important for our children to see their parents express love for each other. We want to show our kids that married couples can still be affectionate even after 15 years of marriage. Our PDA may make our kids cringe, but it lets them know that their parents have a solid relationship. And in turn, it gives them a sense of comfort and security.

Read more of Fred’s writing at Mocha Dad and Frederick J. Goodall

And don’t miss a post! Follow Fred on Twitter and Facebook.

photo via Stock.xchng

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