13 Memorable Charles Dickens' Quotes to Inspire You at Home — Courtesy of Etsy!

It’s not uncommon for thoughts to turn to Charles Dickens around Christmastime. He is, perhaps, most famous for writing A Christmas Carol in 1843, a story of Christmas past, present, and future. The novella was (and is) beloved and has entrenched Victorian Christmas traditions all over the world.

But this Christmas, Charles Dickens may become famous for something else. Ralph Fiennes’ movie, The Invisible Womanwill be released on Christmas day. It tells a different story — the story of Charles Dickens’ secret mistress.

Over 150 years later, we still love celebrity gossip!

While the movie looks intriguing, I prefer to remember Charles Dickens through his literary canon that has meant so much to me. He was not a perfect man, but he wrote beautifully about the human heart, kindness and poverty, and the burden of moral failings against the desire to be better.

  • 13 Memorable Quotes from Charles Dickens 1 of 14
  • Have a Heart That Never Hardens 2 of 14

    From Our Mutual Friend, "Have a heart that never hardens, a temper that never tires, a touch that never hurts."

    Available from Etsy for $20.00

  • Laughter and Good Humour 3 of 14

    From A Christmas Carol, "There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humour." The essence of Christmas!

    Available from Etsy for $41.60

  • Appreciate Home 4 of 14

    This Charles Dickens version of "There's no place like home," where he proclaims, "Every traveler has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering."

    Available from Etsy for $5.00

  • Hope 5 of 14

    From The Wreck of the Golden Mary, "Remember, to the last, that while there is life there is hope."

    Available from Etsy for $25.00

  • Every Line 6 of 14

    From Great Expectations, "You have been in every line I have ever read."

    Available from Etsy for $15.00

  • Far, Far Better 7 of 14

    From A Tale of Two Cities, Sydney Carton's memorable last words: "It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I got to than I have ever known."

    Available from Etsy for $30.00

  • The Best of Times 8 of 14

    The opening line from  A Tale of Two Cities, actually goes on, "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only." (Sometimes you need more than 140 characters.)

    Available from Etsy for $20.17

  • A Word in Earnest 9 of 14

    On the other hand, "A word in earnest is as good as a speech." Sometimes 140 characters is more than enough!

    Available from Etsy for $5.00

  • Never Be Ashamed of Our Tears 10 of 14

    From Great Expectations, "We need never be ashamed of our tears."

    Available from Etsy for $6.00

  • Over-Scrupulous in Attire 11 of 14

    Take note: "Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire." Define "over"?

    Available from Etsy for $4.00

  • Christmas in My Heart 12 of 14

    From A Christmas Carol, "I will honor Christmas in my heart and try to keep it all the year." (That's a lot of elf on the shelf, my friend.)

    Available from Etsy for $12.00

  • Bent and Broken 13 of 14

    From Great Expectations, "I have been bent and broken, but I hope into a better shape." Me too.

    Available from Etsy for $15.00

  • A Loving Heart 14 of 14

    From David Copperfield, "A loving heart was better and stronger than wisdom."

    Available from Etsy for $14.00

Article Posted 2 years Ago
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