Celebrating Winter Solstice with a Lunar Eclipse, Family Traditions & Celebrations

Winter Solstice , the longest night of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, occurs on Tuesday, December 21st this year. This is a great reason to create new family traditions. Here’s what we’re going to do…

Keep reading to find out how you can create new traditions as well as some of the best ways to celebrate with a yule wreath, yule log, solstice feast, & this year’s lunar eclipse!

A Yule Wreath.

Learn about the origin of Yule Wreaths and how to make one.

Or learn how to make an awesome edible Yule Wreath here. (Image from Paul Chens food blog)

A Yule Log.

I love the above from Craftzine.

And I want to make this one from the Gypsy Chef (and eat it too!)

Winter Solstice Feast

This is something that occurs every year in Brooklyn.

I’m thinking about doing one for our family this year. I love creating new traditions!

And finally…

This year, an extra bonus!

A Winter Solstice Lunar Eclipse!

For the first time in 372 years on Winter Solstice night, the sky will be even darker than usual, as a total lunar eclipse and the winter solstice coincide. The only total lunar eclipse of 2010 will be visible from all of North America on Monday night/Tuesday morning of Winter Solstice. And it won’t happen again until 2014!

North America and Central America will have the best view of the lunar eclipse, This year’s event will take 3 hours and 38 minutes. The eclipse begins on Tuesday at 1:33 a.m. ET, when the Earth’s dark-red shadow will turn up on the edge of the moon, according to NASA. It will take about an hour for the shadow to cover the entire moon. Totality begins at 2:41 a.m. and lasts for 72 minutes.

If you only have time for a quick look, NASA recommends that you take a peek 3:17 a.m. ET. That’s when the moon will be fully covered in an amber light.

The U.S. space agency prepared a map showing how much of the eclipse will be visible from different parts of the world. Click here for this map: http://goo.gl/0ZsC.

Top image from Daily World Buzz.

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