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12 Ways to Get Your Kid's Teacher to Like You

While we can all agree it’s far more important for your child’s teacher to like your kid, we people pleasing parents are interested in making the grade too.

Personally, I see nothing wrong with wanting to make a good impression on my son’s teacher. I want her to know that we’re good people who believe in the importance of education and plan to do everything we can as parents to support her educational objectives. Oh, and her thinking we’re super star parents doesn’t hurt either.

When I listen to my teacher friends talk about their students’ parents, they seem to fall into three distinct categories: the good ones, the bad ones, and the ones they’ve never met. Yikes, sign me up for the good parents’ corner!

You can find me working to improve my chances with these 12 ways to get your kid’s teacher to like you – after the jump!


  • Help replenish classroom supplies 1 of 12
    Help replenish classroom supplies
    School budgets are hurting and classrooms are in dire need of things like tissues, dry erase markers, disinfecting wipes, and even paper! Ask your child's teacher for a wish list of classroom supplies and donate when you can!
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Respect the teacher’s authority 2 of 12
    Respect the teacher's authority
    You may not always understand or even agree with your child's teacher's methods, but offer her the respect she deserves should you decide to question them.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Ask questions 3 of 12
    Ask questions
    By all means, if you don't understand your child's assignment or are confused regarding classroom policies - ask! Your child's teacher is ready and eager to help!
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Give thanks 4 of 12
    Give thanks
    Teaching is hard work. Show your child's teacher how much you appreciate the time and dedication shown to your child.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Get involved 5 of 12
    Get involved
    Not every isolated bad grade is cause for alarm but if you see your child struggling in a particular area, contact his teacher for advice. A parent-teacher partnership can help mitigate small problems before they become big ones.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Find the best time 6 of 12
    Find the best time
    Don't expect a parent-teacher conference two minutes before school starts. Making an appointment with your child's teacher shows you value her time and ensures her undivided attention.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Attend parent events 7 of 12
    Attend parent events
    Back-to-School Night and other parent-related events are designed to provide parents with valuable classroom information. Your participation in these events shows you value your child's education.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Get more information 8 of 12
    Get more information
    If your child is having an academic or social problem at school, open-mindedness and non-defensive inquiries may provide valuable insight into what's going on during school hours.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Help at home 9 of 12
    Help at home
    Your child's teacher introduces concepts in the classroom that require practice and proper application at home. Be there to assist your child with homework should the need arise.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Keep your sick child home 10 of 12
    Keep your sick child home
    One sick child puts the entire classroom and teacher at risk. Keep your sick child at home and pick up the day's missed assignments from school.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Come prepared 11 of 12
    Come prepared
    Come prepared to parent-teacher meetings with a list of questions and/or concerns to make the most of your meeting.
    Image credit: Shutterstock
  • Help out 12 of 12
    Help out
    Ask your child's teacher for ways you can help out the classroom. Whether you're able to volunteer inside or outside the classroom, your initiative and support is appreciated.
    Image credit: Shutterstock

For even more ways to start the school year off right, check out 28 more things teachers appreciate!

How else can parents get on the teacher’s good side?

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18 Back-to-School Movies for Kids

8 Tips to Help Prepare You and Your Kids for Back-to-school

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