5 Reasons I Hate Daylight Savings Time as a Parent

If you’re a parent, yesterday at 2am was a time you were not really looking forward to daylight savings time, when we “spring forward” and lose an hour of our day. Before I had children, I didn’t really give this weird time thing any second thought. Then it meant I got off work an hour early or just had to go in an hour extra. That was it — no real worries.

As a parent though, daylight savings time can have a real changing effect on the whole household. My kids are really into routine, and when we lose a whole hour, that routine gets messed up. And then my day gets messed up too.

Here are 5 reasons I hate daylight savings time as a parent:

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  • Why I Hate Daylight Savings Time 1 of 6
    Why I Hate Daylight Savings Time
    As a parent, this "spring forward" thing is not a help at all.
  • They Go To Sleep Way Too Late 2 of 6
    They Go To Sleep Way Too Late
    It's now light out when their bed time hits and instead of falling into a lovely sleep, they complain that the sun is still out and they should be up.
  • One Hour Less of Time for Me 3 of 6
    One Hour Less of Time for Me
    I don't have enough time in the day to get all the things I need to do anyway. When I lose an hour, I really feel it.
  • Their Hunger Schedule is Messed Up 4 of 6
    Their Hunger Schedule is Messed Up
    My kids have always been on a pretty scheduled food routine. It helps keep them happy and energy levels up, but when we lose that hour, I have no real anticipation of when to feed them before that grumpy hunger sets in.
  • It’s Such a Weather Tease 5 of 6
    It's Such a Weather Tease
    Spring forward means that spring is on the way, but really it just means we have to wait a little longer for that good temperature for play.
  • They Wake Up Way Too Early 6 of 6
    They Wake Up Way Too Early
    The kids don't understand the time change and they won't adjust accordingly, which means -- early wake up for mom.

Photo credits: photostock

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