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8 Ideas for Tooth Fairy Fun

One day last week my 5 year old noticed, as he said, that something was “wiggly” in his mouth. He was more alarmed than enthusiastic, never having experienced this before.

It’s just a loose tooth,” I assured him. “It’s not a big deal. it just means that your baby tooth is getting ready to come out.”

But when I saw the look in his eyes I realized that it was, in fact a “big deal” to him. Losing a first tooth is a rite of passage for all children. It signals  moving from “little kid” to “big kid” in a way few experiences do.

Even though we’re already well acquainted with the Tooth Fairy thanks to my 9 year old, this is a brand-new experience to my 5 year old son. Why not make it a little extra special by going beyond the normal routine? In thinking about this I found a great list compiled by another blogger who inspired me.

Here are 8 ways to make the most of your child’s first lost tooth experience. They’re ideas that go beyond the Tooth Fairy pillow and add a little more magic to your child’s life. These ideas aren’t complicated or expensive (some are even free!) but they’re sure to make your little one smile.

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  • Tooth Fairy Printables 1 of 8
    Tooth Fairy Printables
    These free Tooth Fairy Printables will make the experience fun for you and your child. I love that it includes an "invoice" for the child to fill out. It makes a wonderful keepsake!
    For more photos and instructions visit How Does She?
  • Catch Her in the Act 2 of 8
    Catch Her in the Act
    Catch the Tooth Fairy in the act with this great idea. Simply upload a photo of your sleeping child and receive a digital image edited to show none other than the Tooth Fairy herself!
    Get it at ICaughttheToothFairy.com, $9.99
  • Sprinkle a Little Fairy Dust 3 of 8
    Sprinkle a Little Fairy Dust
    For "proof" that the Tooth Fairy visited, create a trail of "fairy dust" in your child's room. If you want less mess, find a spot outside (by the front door, perhaps).
  • Write a Letter to Your Child from the Tooth Fairy 4 of 8
    Write a Letter to Your Child from the Tooth Fairy
    Instead of just leaving money for your child, include a letter from the Tooth Fairy herself. Write an encouraging letter to your child, praising him or her for all the ways you make her proud, but sign it "The Tooth Fairy." This is a great way to positively reinforce your child for good behavior.
  • Make it “Official” 5 of 8
    Make it "Official"
    Your child will love recording the experience using the Tooth Fairy Kit from the Office of the Tooth Fairy. Just place the tooth in the envelope and the complete certificate in the bag, then place the package under your child's pillow. It's a fun way to add a little bit of "grown up" fun as your child goes from little kid to big kid!
    Get it at the Office of the Tooth Fairy, $16
  • Learn About Traditions from Around the World 6 of 8
    Learn About Traditions from Around the World
    This book by Selby Beeler explains lost tooth traditions from around the world. Your child will love learning about other cultures!
    Get it at Amazon, $6.95
  • Use a Tooth Fairy Door 7 of 8
    Use a Tooth Fairy Door
    Place a fairy door in your child's room the night she's supposed to visit. That way, she can easily come in. How cute!
    Get it at Faekeepers, $10
  • Use Fairy Envelopes 8 of 8
    Use Fairy Envelopes
    Use these tiny envelopes instead of a traditional Tooth Fairy Pillow or a as a way for your child to leave a special treat for the Tooth Fairy, such as a not or even a sticker. The possibilities are endless!
    Get it at Terra Viam, $4.95

More by Mary Lauren:

10 Handmade Valentine’s Day Children’s Gifts for $10 or Less

Tips for a Good Night: 10 Bedtime Alternatives to TV for Kids

Navigating the Parent/Teacher Relationship: 10 Tips from Both Sides of the Classroom Door

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