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An Easy Handprint Turkey Thanksgiving Craft For The VERY UnCrafty

We’re not crafty people. Not in the least. That’s not to say we don’t absolutely LOVE the stuff our kids make at school or come up with the times we do do crafts at home, it’s just that my wife and I aren’t artistically inclined.

Still, we do have a tickle trunk with construction paper, paints, colored pencils, googly eyes, and pipe cleaners in our kitchen. We don’t usually set out to do specific ‘craft projects’ per se, but rather let the boys just have at ‘er drawing us pictures to hang in our playroom or on the fridge.

For Thanksgiving, we decided to do something different. I perused Pinterest for a few things that would be easy, non- skilled, and would give us a fun family afternoon activity. Specifically I was looking for an easy handprint turkey.

Here’s a look at the very easy steps to do the beautifully plumed hand and footprint turkey we eventually created with absolutely no skills whatsoever, and links to some other more ambitious projects if you’re so inclined.

  • Hand and Footprint Turkey 1 of 11
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    We just spread the minimal craft supplies we have out on the table and then went at it.

  • Tracing Hands And Feet 2 of 11
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    Have the kids pick their favorite colors of paper from your construction pad. If they like purple and green, go with it.  You'll need to trace about 6-8 copies of their hands to make the plumes, as well as one of each foot to make the body of the bird.

  • Test Layout Before Gluing 3 of 11
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    We laid out our turkey on a piece of paper to see how it would all look when assembled on our actual paper. Mom and dad do the cutting, the boys had fun squeezing out the glue.

  • Make the Plumes 4 of 11
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    Once you know where things are supposed to go, have the kids lay them out where they want. That's the thing to remember: you can help them get all the ingredients together, but they have to be the ones to assemble it to end up with a truly kid made craft.

  • Waddle 5 of 11
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    The boys loved assembling their turkeys. While Charlie (3) could fit all his pieces on the paper, Zacharie (6) has bigger hands and feet that made for a tight squeeze. This craft is better with your younger kids.

  • Googly Eyes 6 of 11
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    Our tickle trunk has a collection of googly eyes in it. You could use black paper, coins, bottle caps, pen, whatever.

  • Ta-Da! 7 of 11
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    That's all there is to it. The two traced out feet make up the body, and then do a variety of coloured hand print traces and cut out for the plumes. A big red circle for the waddle, a triangle for the beak, some googly eyes and legs, and you've got the perfect Thanksgiving kid craft.

  • Pinecone Turkeys 8 of 11
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    If you have some leftover hand prints, send the kids out into the yard to gather some pinecones. You can easily have them scribble what they're thankful for on the feathers and use this as a centerpiece.

    via Pottery Barn Kids

  • Handprint Turkeys 9 of 11
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    If you're into painting up the kids' hands, you can make an entire family of handprint turkeys to hang.

    via I Heart Crafty Things

  • Handprint Painted Turkey 10 of 11
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    There are a couple of different ways you could do this one. One child could do their own turkey, or every member of the family could dip their hands in and lay a print down to help form one thankful art print.

    via Meet the Dubiens

  • Handprint Turkey Family 11 of 11
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    This is the type of craft I originally set out to look for, but once we found our hand and footprint turkey, we chose that. Trace out the whole family and then give it to the kids to color up. I imagine doing a fresh one of these every year would make a great keepsake.

    via Eighteen 25

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