Chinese Students Use IV Drips While Cramming for Exams

I saw this article via Boing Boing about high school students in China who use IVs while cramming for exams. Each student is allotted a certain amount of amino acids each year in case they feel faint during school and need to go to the nurse’s office. With finals coming up they decided it was easier to hook up all the IVs right there in the classroom so kids could cram away.

It makes me a little squeamish to think about but hey, so do tea-soaked eggs. When in Rome!  Does your kid’s school get extreme during end-of-year testing?

Clearly the Chinese value education and hydration. I share these values. But it does remind me of my own kids’ experiences with testing. I’ve got kids in preschool, 3rd grade, 6th grade, and 9th grade. Testing is all the rage and I understand how funding is dependent on it. When testing time rolls around our school becomes very concerned about my kids getting enough sleep, eating healthy food, and not missing class. I want them to do well on their tests and we are lucky to have great schools but I always think they could at least pretend to care about their sleep and nutrition at the beginning of the year, too.

It just seems like it couldn’t be more obvious that the schools are hyper-focused on testing. But you see, it could be more obvious–my kids could be hooked up to IVs.

There are a lot of instances where I would love to be hooked up to an IV. During church, on long drives, at track meets, while mowing the lawn, and first thing in the morning spring readily to mind. Frankly, I’d rather change IV bags than cook dinner most nights. Am I right?

Still, I can’t help but wax nostalgic for my school days with  frosted graham crackers and notes pinned to my clothes when accountability was low and expectations were, also, low. China still beat us in math back then but there’s no way they had access to that much sterile tubing. Them were the days.

Read more from Kacy at Every Day I Write the Book.
Let’s meet up on Twitter and Facebook!

 

Tagged as:

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.