Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

MENU

Dessert Milk and My Declining Cool Factor

One thing I’ve discovered as Anders grows and matures is that it is becoming increasingly difficult to impress him. As a baby all it took to send him into a fit of giggles was a fake sneeze or a raspberry on his tummy.

These days I could bring in a marching band with baton twirlers and a dozen acrobats and parade them through our home, turning flips with drums booming and I would be lucky if he lifted his eyes long enough to roll them at me. It is an unfortunate reality for every parent that our cool factor declines as our children’s age increases and it appears I will not be an exception to this rule.

That’s why, when I find something special — an inside joke, a shared interest, or a ritual between just us two — I milk it for all it is worth. In my case, I mean this literally.

As far as Anders is concerned, I’m the only person around that can make dessert milk. What is dessert milk you ask? Well, I’ll tell you.

Dessert milk is a warmed up cup of milk with chocolate syrup and a dollop of COOL WHIP Whipped Topping stirred in. I also add a little COOL WHIP to the top because Anders likes to make a game of dipping his nose in it “accidentally” while drinking and then asking me if he has anything on his face.

Sometimes I pretend not to notice the COOL WHIP on his nose, at which point he goes to great lengths to create a whipped topping mustache and we both have a laugh.

I usually reserve dessert milk for a treat or as a cure for a bad day at school. I realize it’s nothing more than a fancier glass of milk, but to Anders it is special. It’s something only I make for him and at a time in his life when he is beginning to assert his independence, it’s nice to have a silly moment between the two of us.

What traditions or treats do you enjoy with your children?

A big thanks to COOL WHIP Whipped Topping for sponsoring this campaign. Sponsored posts are purely editorial content and are not advertiser produced. Click here to see more of the discussion.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest