Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Healthy Derailment and Getting Back on Track

Ever feel so gung-ho about something and give 150% only to have a bad day, mess up once, and feel so discouraged you never go back?

Yeah, me too.

I decided 1 ¾ weeks ago to jump aboard the healthy train. Yes, I’m counting the days because adjusting my lazy fried lifestyle has taken quite a bit of work. Oh, and yes, I’m writing posts about health when I’m a health novice myself; moving on … So I got all jazzed about healthy living and I cut out the fat, started exercising, taking Calcium (my bones rejoice) and then it happened — that thing that always freaking happens — life. Yes, life. Something completely unexpected and lame happened to totally throw me off my game. Tell me this has happened to you: you stumble, self-loathe for awhile, and then wonder why you ever decided to commit to something so challenging in the first place.

The self loathing has got to be the worst part. Why should one lousy day of everything going wrong derail 11 whole days of goodness? It shouldn’t. It can’t, because if it does, why should I go back to working on myself? I’ll tell you why, because even the gesture of getting back on track means something. It means I remain committed to a personal promise.

Look, we all need leeway, cheats and all the things that make life worth living but if (or rather, when) we really stumble hard, let’s take a lesson from the experience, ditch the self-loathing and press on like the soldiers we are. If living healthy and changing your mindset was easy, everyone would have done it a long time ago.

Fifteen steps forward and one step back is still 14 steps forward friends. Keep on trucking with me and together we’ll go far!

Thanks very much to Brita for sponsoring this post. Check out more posts in this campaign.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest