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How to Make a Pretend Voting Booth Just in Time for Election Day

The campaign season is a wonderful opportunity to teach kids about the election process. Older kids may be interested about issues that directly affect their lives, while younger children might just be curious about why political commercials have suddenly taken over the airwaves.

As interested as they may be, however, it can also be a frustrating and confusing time for children who aren’t yet able to rock the vote themselves.

Making a pretend voting booth is a great way not only to enhance their learning but to empower them by sending the message that while they still might be too young to cast their votes, their opinions truly do matter.

Here’s how to do it!


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  • Materials 1 of 5
    Materials
    To make your own pretend voting booth, here's what you'll need:
    1. either one very large box (such as a refrigerator box) or two large moving-style boxes
    2. a dowel rod
    3. duct tape
    4. white construction paper, and
    5. decorative flag bunting (optional).
  • Constructing the Booth 2 of 5
    Constructing the Booth
    Reinforce the seams of both boxes with duct tape. Fold one flap over to serve as your booth's voting surface, and support it with a dowel rod.
  • Add the Second Box 3 of 5
    Add the Second Box
    Place the second box on top of the first. The dowel rod will serve as extra support.
  • Make an Opening 4 of 5
    Make an Opening
    Cut an opening out of the side of the box that is across from the "voting surface." Then line the inside of the booth with white construction paper.
  • The Polls are Open! 5 of 5
    The Polls are Open!
    Place a decorative flag bunting across the top of the voting booth. My daughter had fun dressing up to visit the "polling place!" Wonder who got her vote?

More by Mary Lauren:

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