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Multiple Food Allergies Shown to Hurt Child’s Growth

Multiple Food Allergies Shown to Hurt Child's GrowthWe are actually quite lucky when it comes to our kids and food allergies. While we have to eat a gluten free diet due to celiac disease, there aren’t any other real food allergies that the kids have to deal with right now — and I am thankful.

I am already concerned with Raru though when it comes to her growth. She had not been consuming gluten for long before we noticed the adverse affects and so she hasn’t gone through years and years of malnutrition that many experience with undiagnosed celiac disease.  I am hoping that she will grow to the height she was intended to grow to and always maintains a healthy weight (she’s been quite under-weight in the past).

When it comes to kids and food — it plays a big part in how they grow. New research discovered that children with multiple food allergies do have their growth restricted — with lower height, weight and body mass index percentiles.

Lead researcher Dr. Brian Vickery, a pediatric allergist and immunologist in Durham, N.C., and colleagues at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill reviewed the charts of children ages 1 month to 11 years who had visited outpatient clinics from 2007 to 2011. Out of those charts, 245 children with food allergies were identified. The data regarding height, weight and body mass index percentiles of the children with food allergies were compared to 4,584 healthy children of the same age and 205 children with cystic fibrosis and celiac disease with the same age (both which have been found to be associated with growth restriction).

The study found that after the age of 2, children with food allergies had lower BMI and lower percentiles for weight. Taking the data one step farther, the researches also found that the more food allergies present, the larger the divide.

Photo credit: photostock
Study: presented at American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology in San Antonio

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