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Thoughts on Homeschooling an Only Child

Homeschooling an only ChildWhen I think of a homeschool family, I think of one that has a lot of kids. Like – 6. Or more. It’s pretty rare for me to run across a mom who homeschools one child and doesn’t have any more on the way.

We decided to homeschool when my husband joined the military, and at the time we figured we’d have at least 2 more children. We’ve had 3 since then, but none have come home from the hospital.

With Bella the age of most pre-kindergarteners and having no other siblings at home, the thought of, “How is this going to work best for her?” crosses my mind all the time. We live in a city that isn’t homeschooling friendly; no groups that I know of, no conferences come here, no homeschool conventions. The high moving rate with military personnel means even when I do meet another homeschooling family, they usually are getting ready to leave.

While socialization is a huge topic for all homeschooling parents to deal with, it is very much so for parents of an only child. How do we make sure our daughter gets the interaction with others that she needs to grow into a well rounded little girl? Not just peers, but all varieties of ages?

Can we truly excell at homeschooling just her? If we never have any more children will we be able to make her childhood one where she still grows up with close friends that fill in some of those sibling gaps?

I believe we can. With homeschool groups, playdates, and sports that she’ll become involved in as she gets older, not to mention the many military families we’ll always be around, I feel a bit more confident whenever these questions and concerns pop into my mind. We’ll make sure to reevaluate each year and ask if homeschooling is still the best option for all of us.

Photo credit: istockphotos.com

Diana blogs at Diana Wrote about her life with a daughter here and three sons in heaven, life as an army wife, and her faith. You can also find her work on Liberating Working MomsShe Reads TruthThe New York Times, and The Huffington Post. Smaller glimpses into her day are on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

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