Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Welcome to My World

Stay-at-home moms. Working moms. Work-from-home mom. What kind of mother are you?  When I wrote my essay for the e-book Welcome to My World I considered myself a stay-at-home mom.  I’m so glad I had a chance to document my thoughts before my status suddenly changed. Now that I consider myself a work-from-home mom I might have to write an update soon!  Today I’ll introduce you to five more of the authors from the ebook and my favorite quotes from their essays.

I remember when I was pregnant, I loved reading birth stories. I was always shocked how everyone had such different experiences. I wondered what mine was going to be! Cesarean, vaginal, all natural, epidural? That was over 4 years ago. Now that I’m done growing my family, I’m also done endlessly reading birth stories. I find myself seeking after stories about woman balancing their work life and home life. That’s why, now more than ever, I’m so excited to be apart of Welcome to My World. Each of the thirteen bloggers has such completely different stories. I’m in awe of the many ways women are making motherhood work for themselves and their family. Which blogger do you relate to the most? Pick up your copy here.

nggallery id=’126756′

  • “A Working Moms Guide to Field Trips” by Giggle CEO Ali Wing 1 of 5
    "A Working Moms Guide to Field Trips" by Giggle CEO Ali Wing
    The night before our trip, he came into my room and crawled up on to my bed. "Mom?" he asked. "What are you going to wear tomorrow?"
    "I don't know, Tyler. I haven't decided yet. Why?"
    "Well, just so you know, most of the other moms wear jeans and tennis shoes."
    I had to laugh a little. Was he afraid I was going to wear a business suit?
  • “The Price Of Having It All” by Citibabes CEO & Founder Tracey Frost Rensky 2 of 5
    "The Price Of Having It All" by Citibabes CEO & Founder Tracey Frost Rensky
    Being a part of my lucky modern generation of women gave me the confidence to believe I could have it all: a family and a fulfilling career. The only question was, "At what price?"
  • image-280 3 of 5
    image-280
    Trying to thread the mothering needle with a yarn that is made up of two strands my identity as a mom and a professional -- is a bigger challenge than I ever imagined. Entwining the two means I'm often considered neither a stay-at-home or a working mom, but the challenge to be successful has allowed me one thing I never would have achieved if I had focused on only the two traditional choices and that's an opportunity to be brave, try new things and explore unexpected opportunities, all of which have helped me to understand where I can now fit in.
  • “Robot Moms In The Closet” by Rachel Aydt, Author of blog New York Lost And Found. 4 of 5
    "Robot Moms In The Closet" by Rachel Aydt, Author of blog New York Lost And Found.
    I'd like to write a science fiction novel about a woman who has a closet filled with 10 different clones of her self. It could be called "Work From Home, Inc." The Real Mother could go into the closet at any time and turn on the right Mother for the Right Moment.
  • “The Science Of A Working Mother” by Amber Doty, Author of the blog The Daily Doty 5 of 5
    "The Science Of A Working Mother" by Amber Doty, Author of the blog The Daily Doty
    The day I began my career as a scientist I was twenty-one and six months pregnant with Anders. Upon arrival, I was given a tour of the laboratories during which my boss handed me my very own lab coat that I tried and failed to fasten with embarrassment around my protruding belly. I interviewed for the position three months prior and chose not to tell them about my "condition." This would be the first and perhaps the most literal example of my attempts in the coming years to conceal my status as Mommy.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest