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What Do You Do When Your Kids Learn How To Swear?

swearing kidI admit it. I have a foul mouth. I am not careful about the words I use or the company I keep. I let it fly like a drunken sailor. (And, apparently, I’m not alone.)

So my kids know all of the words. All of ‘em.

Still, when they say it, it’s a bad thing.

Even if you keep it clean like Church on Sunday in your house, the kids will go to school and hear it from another child whose family is a little more liberal with the language. (I’m sorry about that, I really am.)

So what do you do when the kids learn how to swear?

Shannon’s kids are 3, 7, and 9. “Mofo” and “shiznit” have started to make their way around her backyard and she’s none too pleased about it.

“Parenting Q of the day: is it okay for my kids to say ‘holy shiznit’ and ‘mofo’??” she asked her Twitter stream.

I’m not the one to be offering advice on how to curb kids from cursing, but Shannon’s friend Kevin served up the best piece of advice for kids who are old enough to know what they’re saying, but shouldn’t be saying it.

“If Grandma and Grandpa asked what those words mean would you feel comfortable telling them?”

Genius. Grandparents are the holy duality of the family unit. The keepers of the best birthday presents, and the spoilers with ice cream. They are a dynamic duo you never want to cross.

You can also rely on the kids to keep the peace and call out people for bad language. My boys do it to me, and so does Erin’s 3 yr old. Her daughter thinks “shut up” is a bad word.

“Recently I said “time to shut ‘er down kids!’” she tweeted. “Morgan told me I was bad! ;)”

“Kids don’t have filters,” Kevin continued. “If I don’t want them to say something out of the house, I have to stop them at home too.”

Kevin’s got it down. Follow up post idea: How do you stop yourself from swearing around your kids?

Image via iStockPhoto

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