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Would You Wash Out Your Kid’s Mouth with Naughty Mouth Soap?

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I must have been around four or five years old, the first time my mother pulled me by my pig tails into the bathroom to scrub my mouth out with soap.

I don’t even remember what I said but I remember my mother taking my toothbrush and scrubbing it across our bar of soap and shoving it into my mouth. Till this day, I cannot bring myself to buy that brand of soap – I don’t care how much it goes on sale for.

Lately, my seven year-old son, Norrin, has been testing the boundaries of my patience. He argues and always wants the last word. Some days it infuriates me. Other days, I have to walk out of the room to keep myself from laughing. When he was diagnosed with autism, he had no language and I wondered whether or not he would ever speak.

So YAY, my son is talking! Boo, a lot of it is sass talk. And it’s the ‘typical’ kid behavior I could do without.

And when Norrin talks back, I am tempted to take a bar of soap to his mouth, the way my mother did. But then I think of our daily toothbrush battles. The way I have to hold him tight and brush his teeth. How difficult it is for Norrin to brush his own teeth. This self-help skill that must be done, feels like punishment to him already.  Then the guilt kicks in.

However…Munchkin‘s newest parenting product the Naughty Mouth Soap Bar, is making me think again. It’s a non-toxic, foul-tasting deterrent to stop children’s inappropriate language! With “flavors” like Whining Wasabi, Lying Liver and Vulgarity Vomit – my curiousity has been peaked.

I mean, yeah, having my mouth washed out with soap was sort of traumatizing. But I survived. And – I learned a valuable lesson that day.

To celebrate the launch, parents who visit the Munchkin Facebook page today, April 1, may enter for a chance to win free products.

(Don’t be surprised if you see my name on their page trying to win.)

Read more of Lisa’s writing at AutismWonderland.

And don’t miss a post! Follow Lisa on Twitter and Facebook!

 

 

 

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