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Study Shows Children Prefer Old Fashioned Summer Fun

we are that familiaI miss the days of playing in the tree house, splashing in puddles, catching fireflies, playing hide and seek at night, sneaking into the neighborhood pool (oh wait, that one should go into the naughty summer fun list) and just lazying around on a hot summer’s day in the backyard talking about nothing.  Just plain good ol’ fashion fun.

Parents, do your summer vacation plans include spending lots of money?  Well, hold onto your wallets and read this first before you go spending hundreds of dollars on your summer plans. This study proves that our kids enjoy the same good old fashion fun that we did as kids. James Hall from the Telegraph shared an interesting study that will make you think twice about the Summer Bucket List you’re making to keep the kids entertained this summer.

good old fashion summer fun

“The findings are in a survey by the supermarket chain Sainsbury’s, which asked 1,500 children aged between 5 and 11 to rank their favourite summer-time activities in order of preference.” Hall reported that, get this, playing in the park was the top pastime   Can you believe this?  We are off spending hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars over the summer when free frugal family fun is at right at our fingertips.

Hall goes on to say, “Mud pie-making, tree-climbing and feeding the ducks also came in the top ten.

The first activity that would cost children’s parent’s money was named as going to the cinema, which was the 12th most popular pastime and came after planting flowers and picking berries.”

I was quite astonished to read this study, though my kids love playing outside, especially if we are joining them in the fun. But still any screen activity quickly trumps all of the activities Hall mentioned above.  Kids these days prefer to stay indoors and play some kind of computer related game than to go outside and enjoy having a water fight. Let’s get our kids off the couch, away from the screen and encourage them to play this summer.

Valerie Strauss at the Washington Post shares, “Play is a remarkably creative process that fosters emotional health, imagination, original thinking, problem solving, critical thinking, and self-regulation. As children actively invent their own scenarios in play, they work their way through the challenges life presents and gain confidence and a sense of mastery. When they play with materials, children are building a foundation for understanding concepts and skills that form the basis for later academic learning.

And it’s not only concepts that children are learning as they play, they are learning how to learn: to take initiative, to ask questions, to create and solve their own problems. Open-ended materials such as blocks, play dough, art and building materials, sand and water encourage children to play creatively and in depth. Neuroscience tells us that as children play this way, connections and pathways in the brain become activated and then solidify.”

So not only are we saving money with good old fashion play, but we are also fostering emotional and social growth as our children interact with each other, with other adults, and with the world around them.

If you’re looking for some good old fashion summer fun, then join our Virtual Summer Camp here on Babble. Stop by and check it out because there’s a Facebook Online Virtual Summer Camp community you can join for ideas and activities all summer long.  Or  follow our Summer Fun Pinterest board that I will be updating all summer long!

 

Join me each week on “We Are That Familia.” I am ecstatic to be sharing with you here on Babble.com on all things “Family” from parenting, recipes, crafts, inspirational (and not so inspirational) stories, and life as we know it. You can catch up on our merrymaking over at my place: Inspired by Familia , on Facebook, and on Pinterest.

 

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