10 Things NOT To Do On Twitter

First I told you what you shouldn’t be posting on Facebook and now I’m telling you what not to tweet. Of course, it’s entirely up to you what you want to post on Facebook and tweet about, but if you consistently do the following things, there’s a good chance I’ll unfollow you (and others will too).

I realize that people use Twitter for all sorts of different reasons, so some of these rules may not apply to you, but they’re at least worth keeping in mind while tweeting.

Here are 10 Things NOT To Do On Twitter:

1. Don’t constantly gush about your own achievements. Your followers do want to hear if you’ve won the Nobel Prize and will, no doubt, be excited for you if/when you are nominated best blogger ever. But if most of your tweets are about your latest accomplishments and all of the acclaim/awards you are receiving, they’ll start to resent you and will unfollow fast.

2. Don’t tweet every single thing you do during the day. Nobody wants to read about how you just got coffee at Dunkin’ Donuts or about how you’re about to get ready for bed. If you’re a brilliant or clever writer, even the mundane can be entertaining, but not all the time.

3. Don’t self-promote all the time. As with #1, it’s okay if you do this some of the time. Again, if someone has chosen to follow you, they probably want to read about your projects and successes. But if your twitter feed consists entirely of self-promotion, it will get old (and dull) fast. So try to balance self-promotion with other sorts of tweets.

4. Don’t beg for retweets, replies or follows. It’s just pathetic.

5. Don’t retweet everything. As with #1-4, it’s okay to do this occasionally, but sparingly. If you create no original content and your twitter feed consists entirely of retweets, there’s no reason for anyone to follow you.

6. Don’t tweet about your kids exclusively. It’s up to you how much you want to discuss your kids on social media. If your toddler says something incredibly funny that you think others might appreciate, go ahead and tweet about it. But try to mix things up and tweet some grown-up things as well or else it will seem as if you’re living vicariously through your kids.

The other night, I tweeted something my 7-year-old said and it got retweeted and favorites, so I think people got a kick out of it. But I won’t do it again for a while. Cute kid sayings can only sustain you so long.

7. Don’t synch your FourSquare account to Twitter. People don’t need to know where you are all the time. And if they choose to follow you on FourSquare, they don’t want to see the information repeated here.

8. Don’t tell us everything you’re eating. That artisinal cheese sounds delicious, but you’re making us hungry. Plus, reading about what other people are eating gets boring really fast.

9. Don’t tweet every time you go for a run or make it to the gym. You’re making us feel really lazy and also (see #8), it gets boring after a while.

10. Don’t tweet once a month and then disappear. I’m not the most consistent tweeter, but I try to tweet at least somewhat regularly. If you really want to be part of the Twitter community, you’ve got to be somewhat consistent about participating. Along those lines, don’t tweet 10 times in an hour and then disappear for a week (confession: I’ve done this).

10.5. Don’t go #crazy with the #hashtags. It’s annoying.

What sorts of things do you think people shouldn’t be doing on Twitter?

Photo: waynehowes/Shutterstock.com

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