First Grade Teacher Makes a Million Dollars Selling Lesson Plans Online

Making a Million Outside the Classroom

Being a first grade teacher may have deep and meaningful rewards, from nourishing children’s minds to helping give kids a head start on their educational career. One thing that this noble career generally does not have? Big financial rewards…unless you are Deanna Jump, that is.

The first-grade teacher from central Georgia just became a millionaire not by winning the lottery or stealing from the school’s coffers. She did so by her teaching skills and by selling her lesson plans to other teachers and schools. How did she do it? Jump joined the website TeachersPayTeachers.com.

The website was stated by Paul Edelman in 2006 and, as ABC News says, is a place where “teachers can post their original material and lessons online and for about for about $5 to $9, other teachers can download and use the materials. The lessons often cover about two weeks of learning on any number of subjects.”  Jump’s original lesson plans were so popular that she made a million dollars just with the sheer number of sales. She has about 60 “units” on the site and has told about 161,000 of them, making her one of the best sellers on the site.

While many would applaud her for not just sharing her knowledge, but for making a impressive amount of money on the side (which she reportedly uses to help support her quadriplegic brother and to not worry about paying her bills), some don’t share such a positive spin on her actions. Some have reportedly criticized her for using her school classroom to test out her lesson plans and for the materials she uses. Others, for some reason “believe teachers shouldn’t get rich.”

I say, why not! They should reap whatever rewards that they can. And if she is making a quick buck helping other teachers, there is no reason why she shouldn’t. What do you think?

Photo Source: Morgue Files

 

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