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2-Year-Old Can Identify More Than 50 Elements. Can You? [VIDEO]

Periodic Table of Elements

A 2-year-old knows 50 of these. Do you?

One thing I know for sure: I am more experienced than a 5th grader.  Smarter?  Eh.  That’s open to interpretation, I suppose.  Let’s just say that if my life depended on me identifying every element on the Periodic Table right now, I’d be dead in about 3 seconds.  I’ve never been very good at math or science, and since my daughter isn’t in kindergarten yet, I haven’t been forced to bone up on the little I might remember from my own school daze.  It looks like it might be time for my 5-year-old and I to invest in some elements flash cards, though, because apparently they’re so easy a 2-year-old can memorize them.

Well, 50 or so of them, anyway.  26-month-old Rose Gallant from Seattle started playing with elements cards after she discovered her mom’s copy of THE ELEMENTS by Theodore Gray.  Her father, Matt, says, “When she pulls out something like Einsteinium and says it really clearly, it kinda blows me away.”  Seattle reporter Lindsay Cohen says, “What started out as a love for her mom’s big colorful book has turned a toddler into a pint-sized scientist.”  Take a look:

You don’t have to watch all nine minutes to get the point – or to feel like you should have paid more attention in science class.  (Just me?)  Rose’s mom, Angie, told Cohen, “She loved the pictures, she loved the letters, she loved the numbers and it just turned into a thing where everyday she would bring me the book. You know, she goes through it so many times a day, I think it was inevitable that she would start picking it up.”

Angie makes an excellent point when she tells Cohen, “People try science for their kids, and their kids end up really liking it.”  I think I’ll read to my daughter from her giant Dinosaurs book tonight.  It’s a start.

Source: Theodore Gray

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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