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5-Year-Old with Gender Identity Disorder Has Public Divided Over Whether or Not Kids Should Live As Opposite Sex

gender identity disorder, gender queer, kids and gender, boy wants to live as girl, princess boys

Zach Avery

Danielle Sullivan wrote this week about three Pediatrics reports that suggest “children and teens who feel they were born the wrong gender are getting more help.” According to Dr. Norman Spack, the author of one of the three reports, 1 in 10,000 children have gender identity disorder. In Britain, a young boy named Zach Avery, now 5, was diagnosed with the disorder at just 4 years old. The British medical community’s willingness to diagnose Zach with such a life-altering condition has the public torn about whether or not it’s okay for a child so young to live as the opposite gender.

The Telegraph reports, “Little Zach was just three when he began refusing to live as a boy, instead choosing to wear pink dresses and ribbons in his long, blonde hair – because he has Gender Identity Disorder (GID). And the primary school he attends in Essex has even changed the kids’ toilets to gender-neutral Unisex in support of Zach since his official diagnosis last year, aged four.”

Zach’s mother told reporters, “He just turned round to me one day when he was three and said: ‘Mummy, I’m a girl’. I assumed he was just going through a phase and just left it at that. But then it got serious and he would become upset if anyone referred to him as a boy. He used to cry and try to cut off his willy out of frustration.”

If that’s not proof this is a real disorder I don’t know what is. Zach’s family, his school and the kids there are supportive and accepting of his life as a girl, but many commenters believe Zach is too young to understand his own mind. One reader, Patrick Kelley, wrote:

At 4 years old, a child doesn’t know what the hell is going on, their minds change so fast it’s silly. I applaud the parents for initially letting it go, but after you let this get into school bathrooms, and such, even if this boy decides to go back, forever he will be known as the little boy who wanted to be a girl. I have many gay friends that identify with the female part more than the male, and even they agree that this is not appropriate for a child of this age.

Tony D says:

I was convinced I was Batman when I was four but my primary school didn’t allow me to wear my costume or take a poo hanging upside down in the gender-specific toilets. And now I no longer believe myself to be the caped crusader. Funny that.

Miles to Code writes:

Thank God that this young lad wasn’t watching GI Joe cartoons or even old Warner Brothers Road Runner cartoons. Think of the possibilities of him imitating those if they were his favorites.

This truly sounds like a kid imitating what he’s seen on television, nothing more, and his parents are indulging him.

If when he’s older he still feels this way, then fine, let him do the changing then.

In response, Alessandra says:

It’s a clue that he was obsessed with the Dora character. As per what his mother reports, he didn’t want to be a girl before watching Dora, even though he had plenty of contact with girls and women. He became obsessed with one female character in particular. Nobody has investigated why.

Liberals are harmfully stupid.

So, what do you think? Is a 3-year-old equipped to recognize that they were born with the wrong outer parts? One thing is for certain, children who do feel gender queer need all the love and support they can get, because according to TIME magazine, “non-conforming kids are at risk for physical and sexual abuse and post-traumatic stress.” A Harvard study shows, “The abuse is most often perpetrated by parents or other adults in the household. And as many as 1 in 10 kids display gender non-conformity before age 11. It’s not clear why gender non-conforming kids suffer more abuse, but it may have to do with parents’ discomfort with their behavior.” Horrible. Thank God for Zach’s loving and enlightened family. Read more about them at The Telegraph.

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