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9 Meals Not to Share With Your Kids

The Center for Science in the Public Interest released their “what not to eat” list of 2010 Xtreme Eating Awards today, helping consumers make better choices when they find themselves away from home and hungry.

It’s not always easy to find a healthy fast food or restaurant meal — especially when you’ve got picky eaters along with you — but it’s easy enough to spot an Xtreme Eating Award winner. Here’s the list:

Five Guys burger and fries: Eat their Bacon Cheeseburger and a large fry, and you’ve gulped down 2,300 calories and over two days worth of saturated fat.

Cheesecake Factory’s Chocolate Tower Truffle Cake: At six inches tall and three quarters of a pound, this tower of terror weighs in at 1,670 calories and 48 grams of saturated fat.

California Pizza Kitchen’s Tostada Pizza: It sounds healthy enough, but the individual-sized Tostada Pizza starts out at a nearly full day’s worth of calories. Add the optional chicken or steak, and you’re swallowing 1,680 calories and 3,300 mg of sodium.

The Cheesecake Factory describes its Pasta Carbonara: And you thought dessert was bad. This bacon and cream infused pasta dish comes adds up to a whopping 2,500 calories and four days’ worth of saturated fat.

Other winners include P.F. Chang’s Double Pan-Fried Noodles Combo, 1,820 calories and five days of salt, Outback’s rack of lamb plus sides at nearly 1,900 calories, Chevy’s Crab & Shrimp Quesadilla’s 1,650 calories, California Pizza Kitchen’s Pesto Cream Penne at 1,350 calories, and Bob Evan’s stuffed pancakes — a hot mess at 1,380 calories and 27 teaspoons of sugar.

I think I gained five pounds just writing that. Why do restaurants keep cooking up these destructively unhealthy options? Because customers keep buying them. Until more people stand up and demand healthier options, there will always be an Xtreme Eating Award.

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