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A Royal Tweet

Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan has one of the largest Twitter followings of global female leaders (1.6 million+) and in 2010, was the recipient of The Tech Museum’s James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award for applying technology to benefit humanity. So it’s no surprise that supporters of Change.org’s campaign to investigate allegations of serial rape in a Jordanian factory are calling on Her Majesty to tweet her support for victims.

Activists believe that tweets from the Queen could inspire Wal-Mart, Land’s End, Hanes, Jones Group, Kohl’s, and Target to act, even though they have not done so yet despite over 137,000 signatures on a Change.org’s petition to their management teams. The petition started by The Institute for Global Labor and Human Rights asks these companies and other labels to either end the gross women’s and human rights violations or, if they are unable to do so, to stop sourcing their clothing from Jordan’s Classic factory.

Charles Kernaghan, Executive Director of the Institute for Global Labor and Human Rights says “A single tweet from the Queen could move the company to end these abuses. We’ve tried targeting the big brands that purchase their goods from this factory but they have not moved to take positive action. So now we are turning to a powerful women’s rights advocate who we know cares deeply about this issue.”

But what do you think? Will this plea fall on deaf royal ears?

Queen Rania’s is most known for her as an education advocate. A mother of four herself, she tirelessly crusades to reform education in Jordan. For this work, she is a mominee for Babble’s 100 Moms Who Are Changing the World.

Upon receiving her Tech Award, she spoke eloquently about the combination of ingenuity and compassion. But although her following is monstrous, 628 tweets in two years does not exactly make her a Top Twitter User. And more telling, I only counted a handful of @replies in her entire stream. Yes, I scrolled all the way back to the beginning on May 9, 2009.

But don’t despair. Twitter is a democracy. The Queen herself told TechCrunch, “It’s about using social media for social change: creating a community of advocates who can use their voices on behalf of the voiceless.”

The community of which she speaks is us. You have an opportunity to stand with the women victims in Jordan, or for any cause that you are passionate about. Queen Rania may have a megaphone but thanks to technology and ingenuity, so do you.

Queen Rania at The Tech Awards

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