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Another Earthquake In Arkansas: Should We Worry?

earthquake in Arkansas, earthquakes in arkansas, weather st louis, climatempo, clima tempo, inpe, parenting worries,

Over 700 earthquakes have occurred in Arkansas in the past six months.

First it was the birds, and then it was the fish. Just last month, animals seemed to be dying out of the blue in Arkansas.

Now it’s the earthquakes that just might have Arkansas residents on alert. It has been reported that more than a few small earthquakes have taken place there this week with no known cause.

Last night, a 4.7 magnitude quake was recorded at 11pm that was felt in four surrounding states. Nearly twenty minutes later, a 3.8 quake followed, and a third 3.6 magnitude earthquake occurred at 2:46am Monday morning. Luckily, no serious injuries have been reported.

The Associated Press has reported that more than 700 quakes have occurred in the area over the past 6 months. The Arkansas Geological Survey has classified the prior phenomena as part of what is now called the Guy earthquake swarm.

The Huffington Post reports that there may be an explanation:

Scott Ausbrooks, geohazards supervisor for the Arkansas Geological Survey, said the quakes are part of what is now called the Guy earthquake swarm a series of mild earthquakes that have been occurring periodically since 2009. A similar swarm occurred in the early 1980s when a series of quakes hit Enola, Ark.

Ausbrooks said geologists are still trying to discover the exact cause of the recent seismic activity but have identified two possibilities.

“It could just be a naturally occurring swarm like the Enola swarm, or it could be related to ongoing natural gas exploration in the area,” he said.

If I lived in Arkansas, I’d might be on edge. Back in my single days, I was much less worried. All the things that my mother told me, to be careful on the subway, watch the cars while crossing the street,  stay away from trees during thunderstorms, I find myself repeatedly saying to my own kids. My latest phrase is “Be aware” when my daughter goes out because I think that covers all the bases.

I remember back in the day when I was carefree. Like most young people, I didn’t anything would ever happen to me. Now I honestly rarely have carefree days. Things happen, like accidents, terrorism, random acts of violence, and we often have no control over them.

When I became a mother, my worry increased tenfold. It’s not a good thing. I’m not a germaphobe like some of my mom friends are; my kids get sick pretty predictably and fight it off just fine. I’m not as hard-nosed as others who demand they take their shoes off when they enter the house and I’m not like another mom I know who doesn’t let my kids go on sleepovers. I try to weigh each situation and make an informed decision based on logic, rather than worry. But, this is a challenge for me. I think we all have our own situations that push our comfort zones as parents.

The Arkansas Geological Survey is offering explanations for the recent seismic shifts which helps alleviate the fear surrounding the word earthquake. This must bring some relief to area parents, and I’m sure some parents aren’t worried that much at all. Every parent has a different sensibility surrounding worry. Once those precious babies are born,  we are responsible for them and their well-being, and it’s a big job. We try to protect them as much as we can but also have to eventually let go.

What about you? What freaks you out as a parent? What keeps you up at night? Or are you more laid back and don’t worry much? If so, how do you do it?

Image: Stockxchng

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