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Are The Anti-Smoking Ads Too Graphic For Children?

anti smoking, smoking hazards, FDA anti smoking campaign, FDA anti smoking ads, second hand smoking, smoking ban, quality of life lawsThe Food and Drug Administration approved nine new labels today to be added to cigarette packages that include some disturbing images. Some of the ads display autopsy scars and rotting teeth accompanied by statements such as, “Smoking can kill you” and “Cigarettes cause strokes and heart disease.”

Some say that these images are entirely too graphic, might scare kids, and make people feel uncomfortable, but isn’t that the point?

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius says the imagery works, “These labels are frank, honest and powerful depictions of the health risks of smoking, and they will help. These labels will encourage smokers to quit  and prevent children from smoking.”

The ads are set to be placed on the top half of cigarette packages so the chances that kids will see them is not as great, unless a family member smokes. In that case, they may very well scare the child and cause them to worry about the person who does smoke. Yet on the positive side, it may also help that child remember how smoking can be harmful so they never learn to smoke themselves when they get older.

Check out all nine ads for yourself and let us know if you think they are too graphic, or if they are just reflect the physical truth of what can happen to a body when you smoke.

Images: FDA


  • Heart attack and stroke 1 of 9
    Heart attack and stroke
  • Smoking and pregnancy 2 of 9
    Smoking and pregnancy
  • Rotting teeth 3 of 9
    Rotting teeth
  • Autopsy photo 4 of 9
    Autopsy photo
  • Affects nonsmokers, too 5 of 9
    Affects nonsmokers, too
  • Smoking hurts kids 6 of 9
    Smoking hurts kids
  • Lung disease 7 of 9
    Lung disease
  • Physically addictive 8 of 9
    Physically addictive
  • Quitting can be done 9 of 9
    Quitting can be done

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