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Are Your Kid's Toys Hurting Their Hearing?

I Am T-Pain Mic is LOUD!

If you are a non-Montessori-ish parent, you are very familiar with the annoying audible din that modern toys can inflict on a household. From buzzers, to beeps to a contrast refrain of “that tickles,” toys today are noisy. But it turns out they are not just annoying to us sensitive quiet loving adults but can emit dangerous decibels to our kids ears. Are our kid’s toys destroying their hearing?

The University of California, Irvine did a study of the noise emitted from a couple dozen popular toys including some popular Christmas picks like Road Rippers Lightning Rods and the I Am T-Pain musical microphone and found they could be doing damage to our kids hearing.  Some of these toys came in at “90 decibels and several reached 100 or more — equivalent to the noise of a chainsaw, subway train or power mower.” Wow, as loud as a subway?

“Generally, toys are safe if used properly,” Dr. Hamid Djalilian  of UC Irvine said in a statement. “We tested the sound levels at the speaker and again at 12 inches, which is about the length of a toddler’s arm.” If the toy is too close, it can have adverse affects. “Children are very sensitive to loud and high-pitched sounds. Unfortunately, hearing loss from noise damage is permanent and not currently curable,” Djalilian said. “The louder a sound is, the less time it takes to cause hearing loss.”

What were some of the biggest offenders? UPI reported these as making the list:

Road Rippers Lightning Rods has a decibel level of 108 and 68 12 inches from the speaker.

I Am T-Pain microphone/101 dB /64 dB.

Tonka Mighty Motorized Fire Truck/100 dB /69 dB.

Marvel Super Shield Captain America/ 98 dB/ 69 dB.

Whac-A-Mole game/ 95 dB / 69 dB.

Do you avoid buying noisy toys for your kids?

 

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