Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

As if Having Madonna for a Mom Wasnt Hard Enough, Now Shes Publicly Criticizing Her Daughter

Madonna

No one's perfect, Madonna. Like you. On the guitar.

I’m a huge fan of Madonna. On most days there’s nowhere I’d rather be than in the audience at one of her concerts — preferably circa 1985 and the “Dress You Up” era. Or wearing a lace headband while posing in front of my bedroom mirror and listening to “Like a Virgin” circa 1984.

However, she’s one of the last women I’d ever want as a mom. I’m sure she’s loving and devoted. But try following in her footsteps and see what a loser you’d feel like. I mean, name one exceptionally accomplished person — like, millions-and-millions-of-albums-sold accomplished — who produced an offspring that was just as successful. Even if the offspring wasn’t looking for the same kind of success, the comparisons would still be inevitable, right?

So how about being Madonna’s daughter, Lourdes, 14, and having your mom criticizing you publicly? Can anyone sing “Mama Don’t Preach?”

Mommyish writes about an interview the Material Girl recently did with Harper’s Bazaar and how she “keeps an editorial eye” on Lourdes’ blog:

“I proofread her blogs and then edit them and give her a hard time when I think she’s being a lazy writer,” Madonna said.

Here’s the thing: I totally applaud Madonna for holding her daughter to a high standard. First, Lourdes’ blog is on the mother/daughter’s joint fashion website, Material World, so if Lourdes wants to enter the big league, she has to keep up with the big kids. Second, parents should let their kids know that they’re going to give them a loving push if they’re capable of doing better. All is fair and good.

But keep it to yourself, Madonna, if you think your daughter can be lazy. Like Michelle Obama talking publicly about her daughters being overweight — when public figures criticize their kids, it makes it OK for the public to also criticize the kids of public figures. And that’s just unfair and bad.

Let kids be kids without having to endure any public shame for once again not being as good as their parents are (at least publicly) — at anything.

Would you want to be criticized publicly if your mom was Madonna?

Image: Wikipedia

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest