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Belly Button Box - Would You Save the Umbilical Cord?

oitachi3img_assist_customWe take pictures to preserve precious memories, cut locks of those sweet baby curls for the baby book.  Some parents even save their children’s teeth.  But is this trend of saving every artifact of a kid’s childhood going too far?

Take, for instance, the belly button box.

This teardrop box is made out of wood especially designed to preserve baby’s umbilical cord for years to come.  Sold in Japan for under $7, it can even be personalized with baby’s name or a  message.

And if that’s not enough nostalgia for you, the company also sells boxes for baby’s first fingernail clippings.

While this might seem a little weird, it’s actually common in some cultures for parents to save their baby’s umbilical cord, either for the child or for themselves.  In some First Nation tribes the umbilical cord is placed in a medicine pouch, a sign of respect for the connection between mother and child or the child and Mother Earth.

Weirder, I think, is the idea of saving fingernail clippings.  But then again, some might think that the little locks of hair I have taped into my girls’ baby books is strange, too.  Or the vial of my baby teeth that my mom still has in her old jewelry box.

It boils down to the fact that children are only small for a few short years.  Their childhood’s slip through our fingers, even as we grasp at ways to hang on to them.  These small mementos don’t slow down those sands of time, but maybe they’re our way of hanging on those moments that pass so quickly.

What about you?  Have you saved things like baby hair, baby teeth, or even the umbilical cord?  Or do you stick to taking pictures?

Photo: inventorspot.com

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